Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) about Ceiling Fans

These FAQs will give you quick answers to the most common ceiling fan questions. Need more assistance? Get Expert Help from our staff.

What ceiling fan size is right for my room?
How do ceiling fans cool a room?
How do ceiling fans warm a room?
In what direction should I operate my ceiling fans during summer and winter?
How much can I expect to save in heating/cooling costs using ceiling fans?
Can my ceiling fan be adapted to use a light kit?
What length downrod should I use with my ceiling fan?
What is ceiling fan blade pitch?
My ceiling is sloped (not flat). Can I still install a ceiling fan?
Can I use a ceiling fan outside?

What fan size is right for my room?

To get maximum comfort and energy savings, it is necessary to choose the correct size fan for a room. Blade span is the key. A fan that is too small or too big for your room may look awkward. A fan that is too small probably will not move enough air and a fan that is too big might overpower the room. We recommend the following:
  • Large Rooms - For rooms up to 225 square feet (15' x 15') and larger, use a fan with a blade span of 50", 52", 54" or 56".
  • Medium Room - In rooms up to 144 square feet (12' x 12') we recommend fans with blade spans of 42" or 44".
  • Small Rooms - Rooms up to 64 square feet (8' x 8') should use a fan with a 32" blade span.

See Indoor Ceiling Fans »

For RoomsBlade Span
64 sq. ft32"
144 sq. ft42"
225 sq. ft44"
400 sq. ft52"

How do ceiling fans cool a room?

A ceiling fan cools a room by creating a "wind chill effect"; it does not lower the room temperature. "Wind chill effect" makes you feel cooler by accelerating the evaporation of perspiration on your skin. It is the feeling you get when you open the window in a moving car. If you have a ceiling fan in a room whose temperature is 80 degrees, running the fan can create a "wind chill effect" that makes you feel as if the temperature is 72 degrees. When used in conjunction with an air conditioner, a ceiling fan can lower energy costs, because you can set the thermostat of your air conditioner at a higher temperature.

How do ceiling fans warm a room?

A ceiling fan can help lower energy consumption in the winter by up to 10%. The temperature of the air in a heated room varies in layers; the air near the ceiling is warmer than the air near the floor, because warm air rises. A ceiling fan can help push the warmer air that is trapped near the ceiling back down into the room, thus "de-stratifying" the layers of warm air. As a result, the warm air is circulated where it is needed, and the heating system does not overwork to warm the room. To properly "de-stratify" a warmed room, the ceiling fan should be run in a clockwise direction. This pushes the air up against the ceilings and down the walls, to gently re-circulate the warm air without creating a cooling "wind chill effect."

In what direction should I operate my ceiling fans during summer and winter?

Summer: Counter Clockwise
Winter: Clockwise

Summer

Counter Clockwise
 
 
Winter

Clockwise

How much can I expect to save in heating/cooling costs using ceiling fans?

Ceiling fans can provide year-round energy efficiency and cost savings. A ceiling fan can save up to 40% on summer cooling costs, and up to 10% on winter heating costs. During winter, it can move heat trapped near the ceiling back into the living area, reducing heating costs by up to 10%. This is especially valuable in rooms with high or vaulted ceilings. Savings will vary depending on local climate conditions and energy rates.


Casablanca Ceiling fans provide year-round energy efficiency and cost savings. In summer, a Casablanca fan can cut air conditioning bills by as much as 40%. In winter, it can move heat trapped near the ceiling back into the living area, reducing heating costs by up to 10%. This is especially valuable in rooms with high or vaulted ceilings.

Can my ceiling fan be adapted to use a light kit?

Yes. Most of today's modern fans are. The light kit attaches to the bottom of the fan's switch housing and requires only a simple electrical connection. However, it really varies from manufacturer and model. And not all light kits are interchangeable with one another. Please consult with us in regards to your specific fan needs, we'd be happy to help with your light kit selection.

What length downrod should I use with my ceiling fan?

A general formula for calculating downrod length is the following:
ceiling height in feet minus 9' = downrod length. This formula is based on the fan-to-floor distance of 8 feet plus 1 foot for the dimension of the fan. So if your ceiling height is 12 feet, you need a 3 foot downrod in order to properly position the fan 8 feet from the floor.

What is ceiling fan blade pitch?

Blade pitch is the angle of the blades when compared to the horizontal. Quality fans generally have a blade pitch of 12-14 degrees. Lesser fans can have a blade pitch as low as 8 or 10 degrees. The higher the pitch, the more pressure the fan blade applies to the air in front of it as it turns and the more air is forced downward. That's why some lesser quality fans can look like they're spinning up a storm, but when you stand under them, you can't feel anything. Again, the best way to judge is to test the fan in actual use.

My ceiling is sloped (not flat). Can I still install a ceiling fan?

Most manufacturers offer an optional "sloped ceiling" adapter that will allow you to hang your fan at any angle up to 48 degrees.

Can I use a ceiling fan outside?

You can use a ceiling fan anywhere you have a ceiling. Covered decks, porches and gazebos make great spots for a fan. Underwriter's Laboratory lists fans for outdoor use are two types of listings: "damp location" and "wet location". Damp location is suitable for most outdoor uses while wet location is intended for more severe situations.

See Damp Location Ceiling Fans »

See Wet Location Ceiling Fans »

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